Minnesota Legislators and Law Enforcement Wage Synthetic Drug War

Minnesota Legislators and Law Enforcement Wage Synthetic Drug War

The State of Minnesota is now pushing for a law that will ban any drug not approved by the Food and Drug Administration, reports from the Pioneer Press indicate. The proposal for the bill, sponsored by a Duluth Democrat and has bipartisan support along with law enforcement support, comes after a long battle between Minnesota legislators, law enforcement and government officials and the synthetic drug industry.

The most well known peddler of such synthetic drugs in Minnesota is Jim Carlson and synthetics were sold in the popular Duluth store, the Last Place on Earth, which Carlson owned. Carlson was charged in federal court with a number of crimes resulting from his dealings with synthetic drugs and The Last Place on Earth.

Synthetic drugs were found at the sites of two dead Minnesotans in Mankato and police cited the danger of the drugs to local media, urging people not use them or sell them because it could result in death and homicide charges for the seller, according to the Mankato Gazette. Many of these synthetic drugs were created in labs, where industries would simply change their chemical compounds within the drugs each time a new substance was made illegal. Legislators compared it to playing whack-a-mole with the industry. The new proposed law would change that dynamic, with the addition of education for middle- and high-schoolers, according to its advocates in the Minnesota legislature in Saint Paul. However, it would only add $100,000 for the education component.

Many agree that the popularity of both pharmaceutical drugs and synthetic recreational drugs, which often have the same effects as heroin, LSD, ecstasy, etc., is becoming an issue with Minnesota teens and young adults seeking the party life or an easy escape. These drugs can kill and are designed for maximum intoxication. They are often packaged in a provocative manner in attempts to market to the counter culture of drug users, as was the case with the Last Place on Earth in Duluth and the packaging found near the deceased in Mankato.