Koch Foundation Not Happy with Healthcare Reform Effort

Picture from the Aspen Institute campus in Aspen, Colorado. David H. Koch Building at the Aspen Institute. Wikimedia Commons. Image by Bluerasberry.

According to nbcnews.com, the Koch Foundation isn't very happy with the majority Republican House and Senate bills proposed to repeal and replace Obamacare, bills that rapidly lost support among both conservative and moderate Republican congressmen.

Those members of Congress have been getting an earful from their constituents, everyone from regular folks, such as the 22 million that might become uninsured, to the industries, non-profits and smaller state/local/county governments that will certainly have to pick up the slack from the lack of federal funding for basic healthcare. Cuts to these programs are seen by many as a transfer of wealth, funding millionaires with tax cuts at the expense of health care for all. Many in Congress also were not happy cutting help to those suffering from opioid addictions that need drug treatment. But also, hospitals and other health care groups are unhappy as well because it leads to either uncertainty or losses, neither of which bode well for them.

Photo:Picture from the Aspen Institute campus in Aspen, Colorado. David H. Koch Building at the Aspen Institute. Wikimedia Commons. Image by Bluerasberry.
The Koch Foundation, created under the umbrella of the empire of the Koch brothers and Koch Industries, based in Kansas, is not happy either. The Koch Foundation stance, however, is that the bill doesn't go far enough to dismantle Obamacare and the Affordable Care Act.

The Koch organization is infamous for their staunch stance on conservative "libertarian" politics and their major cash campaign contributions to politics. NBC reported the group will invest another $300 to 400 million in policy guiding in the 2018 mid-term election. Koch is anti-Obamacare and they are spending the money to get rid of it.

Most panelists at events the Koch Foundation attends, where there are conservatives and so-called libertarians among company, either disprove or are undecided about the GOP Better Care Reconciliation Act in current form. This is not for the same reason or logic as most polled Americans, but because of their philosophies in regard to this type of policy. They are generally against most types of subsidies with a preference for the private market in almost all, if not all, services provided to the public.

Many Republicans felt the pressure at the Koch retreats as was evident in these reports. President Donald Trump, meanwhile, is confident the House and Senate can pass some type of healthcare reform soon.